Saturday, 6 February 2010

Digging deeper at Lurgan in the 1911 Census

Thanks to Emma Dwyer, daughter of my wife's brother Kev Dwyer for bringing a section of the 1911 Irish Census to my attention which I had not noticed before. This is where the training of a professional  archaeologist such as Emma comes in handy above the passionate though at times amateur efforts of the common or garden genealogist! Someone to dig a little deeper shall we say and also who knows where to dig.

The 1911 Irish Census (and I am not sure whether this also applies to the Census for England and Wales of the same period), contains  not only a page listing the residents of any given abode, but also contains a supplementary page recording the number and type of buildings including out houses, number of rooms in a dwelling, tenancy or ownership arrangements, etc.

For urban dwellings, especially those of the working class, this information may be of passing interest and merely confirm how poor the majority of people were in our particular family (I'm afraid no unclaimed fortunes so far folks and if there had been ...do you think I'd tell you?) However, for families such as the Stone family of Lurgan where we know there was a dividing up of farm land between siblings at various points in the 19th and early 20th centuries, it does give us an added insight into how people were living and how they compared to their close neighbours.

Incidentally, my wife Theresa has confirmed that Lurgan has always refered to a wider area of farms and homes, not just the ancestral family farm which Uncle Dan inherited (I have been under the wrong impression that Dan's farm was specifically called Lurgan but actually in rural terms it's the equivalent to an urban neighbourhood) and she also adds that in her own memory the Lowe family (as mentioned in the Census details below) lived in the more impressive looking house in the area.

Below is an image of the original Census page for the whole of Lurgan, followed by my transcription:


Form B1
House and Building Return

Parliamentary division No.2 Tullamore.
Poor Law Union - Tullamore
District Electoral Division - Gorteen
Townland - Lurgan
Barony - Kilcoursey
Parish- Kilmanaghan

House number 1
Head of family John Corrigan
A built private and inhabited dwelling with 4 out-offices/farmsteadings.
House is built of stone, brick or concrete with a roof made of wood, thatch or other perishable material. The house has 2 occupied rooms and 2 windows at the front. It is considered a 3rd class house and is home to 6 people.
John Corrigan owns his house.

House number 2
Head of family Daniel Callaghan

A built private and inhabited dwelling with 7 out-offices/farmsteadings.
House is built of stone, brick or concrete with a roof made of wood, thatch or other perishable material. The house has 3 occupied rooms and 3 windows at the front. It is considered a 2nd class house and is home to 3 people.
Daniel Callaghan owns his house

House number 3

Head of family John Stones
A built private and inhabited dwelling with 10 out-offices/farmsteadings.
House is built of stone, brick or concrete with a roof made of wood, thatch or other perishable material. The house has 4 occupied rooms and 3 windows at the front. It is considered a 2nd class house and is home to 5 people.
John Stones owns his house

House number 4

Head of family John Henson
A built private and inhabited dwelling with 6 out-offices/farmsteadings.
House is built of stone, brick or concrete with a roof made of wood, thatch or other perishable material. The house has 3 occupied rooms and 3 windows at the front. It is considered a 2nd class house and is home to 5 people.
John Henson owns his house

House number 5

Head of family Rose Stone
A built private and inhabited dwelling with 8 out-offices/farmsteadings.
House is built of stone, brick or concrete with a roof made of wood, thatch or other perishable material. The house has 3 occupied rooms and 3 windows at the front. It is considered a 2nd class house and is home to 5 people.
Rose Stone owns her house

House number 6

Head of family Anne Stone
A built private and inhabited dwelling with 4 out-offices/farmsteadings.
House is built of stone, brick or concrete with a slate, iron or tiled roof. The house has 4 occupied rooms and 4 windows at the front. It is considered a 2nd class house and is home to 5 people.
Anne Stone owns her house

House number 7

Head of family Daniel Stone
A built private and inhabited dwelling with 9 out-offices/farmsteadings
House is built of stone, brick or concrete with a roof of wood, thatch or other perishable material. The house has 4 occupied rooms and 4 windows at the front. It is considered a 2nd class house and is home to 7 people.
Daniel Stone owns his house.

House number 8

Head of family George Lowe
A built private and inhabited dwelling with 11 out-offices/farmsteadings
House is built of stone, brick or concrete with a slate, iron or tiled roof. The house has 7 occupied rooms and 7 windows at the front. It is considered a 1st class house and is home to 5 people.
George Lowe owns his house.

House number 9

Head of family Joseph Fleming
A built private and inhabited dwelling with 4 out-offices/farmsteadings
House is built of stone, brick or concrete with a wood, with a roof made of thatch or other perishable material. The house has 3 occupied rooms and 3 windows at the front. It is considered a 2nd class house and is home to 4 people.
Joseph Fleming owns his house.

House number 10

Head of family William G Lowe
A built private and inhabited dwelling with 12 out-offices/farmsteadings
House is built of stone, brick or concrete with a slate, iron or tiled roof. The house has 5 occupied rooms and 5 windows at the front. It is considered a 2nd class house and is home to 7 people.
William Lowe owns his house

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