Saturday, 26 November 2011

The family of Edward Grennan and Rose Stones

We have previously found out (see post below) that Theresa's g-g-grandparents were Timothy Stones and Elizabeth Cahill of Lurgan in County Offaly.

We also discovered that Timothy and Elizabeth had an incredible 12 children, one of whom was Theresa's g-grandfather Daniel Stones born in 1846.

It seems from baptismal records from Tubber church that amongst the 12 children were 2 daughters both named Rose, one born in 1841 and one born in 1852. The most likely explanation for this is that the first daughter named Rose may have died in childhood and the second one being named in her memory.

To people in the 21st century, this may sound like an unusual thing to do but there is evidence that it was a common and acceptable practice in 18th and even 19th century communities.

Theresa's niece Emma Dwyer shared these notes about the practice: 

"As for the two Roses - it wasn't that uncommon to name a new child after an older, deceased sibling. Grace Karsken's book 'The Rocks: Life in Early Sydney' is the only book I can immediately lay my hands on which goes into this (well worth a read if you can get your hands on a copy). Some historians claim the practice died out in England in the early 18th century, but actually, it didn't, and pops up in other contexts too (such as Australia). Karskens reccons that it was a way of restoring the memory of the dead child, and making something joyful and celebratory out of a tragedy."

"In the case of the Rocks in Sydney (and other inner-city areas described by contemporary social commentators as 'slums') there were other reasons for giving the same name to two children - not everyone, necessarily, got married, or had children with the people to whom they were married! And so as a way of recognising the parentage of children, the parents names were passed on more often than they are now. Judith Simpson called her three sons after their different fathers, resulting in two of her sons both being called James (and both being alive at the same time). Not that the Stones would ever get up to that kind of business..."

Whatever the story behind the two siblings who shared the name Rose Stone at baptism, it seems that one of them was to marry a local man named Edward Grennan.

On 25th November 1875, Rose Stones of Lurgan married Edward Grennan of Cloghatanney at Tubber Church. The bride's father was Timothy Stones of Lurgan and the groom's father was Edward Grennan (deceased) a farmer. The best man was James Grennan and the bridesmaid was Mary Anne Stones. The priest was Michael Callary.

If the theory that the first daughter named Rose died in childhood is correct, then this must therefore be the second daughter named Rose, born in 1852, making her 23 years old when she married.

A search of the 1901 census reveals the family of Edward and Rose Grennan living at house 2 in Cloghatanny (Tinamuck, King's Co.). They have 5 children.

Rose Grennan was aged 45 in 1901 according to the 1901 census, about 4 years younger than her projected age from baptism, which is close enough in terms of old records.  



The family are recorded as follows:

Grennan, Edward, 60, Male, Head of Family, Roman Catholic, born Kings Co, Farmer, Read and write - Married -

Grennan, Rose, 45, Female, Wife, Roman Catholic, born Kings Co - Read and write - Married -

Grennan, Anne, 15, Female, Daughter, Roman Catholic, Kings Co, Scholar, Read and write - Not Married -

Grennan, John, 13, Male, Son, Roman Catholic, Kings Co, Scholar, Read and write - Not Married -

Grennan, Rose, 11, Female, Daughter, Roman Catholic, Kings Co, Scholar, Read write - Not Married -

Grennan, Teresa, 9, Female, Daughter, Roman Catholic, Kings Co, Scholar, Read and write - Not Married -

Grennan, Christina, 5, Female, Daughter, Roman Catholic

1911 Census

Rose Grennan nee. Stones can be found still residing at Cloghatanny in the 1911 Census, though by this time her husband Edward has died and she is listed as a widow. What is also of note from this census record is that she states she had had 12 children (the same number as her own mother) and 11 were alive. Thus we can speculate that the Grennans, like the Stones, were a sizeable family in the Moate area.  

Residents of a house 18 in Cloghatanny (Tinamuck, King's Co.)

Grennan, Rose, 58, Female, Head of Family, Roman Catholic, born Kings Co, Farmer, Read and write - Widow - married for 35 years, 12 children born, 11 surviving 

Grennan, John, 22, Male, Son, Roman Catholic, born Kings Co - Read and write - Single - - - -

Grennan, Rose Anne, 20, Female, Daughte,r Roman Catholic, Kings Co - Read and write - Single - - - -

Grennan, Christina, 15, Female, Daughter, Roman Catholic, Kings Co - Read and write - Single -

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