Tuesday, 30 August 2011

National League of the Blind Ireland

National League of the Blind of Ireland:

The National League of the Blind of Ireland is an information service for blind workers. It is a registered Trade Union and provides information on free legal aid and advisory services. It promotes rehabilitation training, employment, education and welfare for all blind people.

The National League of the Blind of Ireland Trust was established in 1898 and is the only blind organisation run by the blind for the blind. It is based at 21 Hill Street, Dublin 1.

A reference to the National League of the Blind Ireland can be found in Hansard (House of Commons 1918)

HC Deb 18 February 1918 vol 103 c468 468


76. Mr. BOLAND asked the Chief Secretary for Ireland why the Irish branches of the National League of the Blind have not been represented on the Advisory Committee for the welfare of the blind in Ireland, seeing that this representation has been given in the case of England and of Scotland? 

Mr. DUKE A representative of the Dublin Branch of the National League of the Blind has been co-opted on the Industrial Training and Workshops Sub-Committee of the Irish Advisory Committee on the Blind.

Did the NLBI have the same roots as the NLB in Britain?

There is an interesting article at the link below which discusses the history of the National League of the Blind in the UK and the ideological issues around why the League defined itself as a Union as opposed to a charity. 

The article refers to the establishment of an unregistered organisation called the National League of the Blind Great Britain and Ireland in 1894:

"The group was established to promote the demands, outlined later in the manifesto above, and in 1897 they elected one of its founder members Ben Purse to become the first full time secretary (Purse, 1916a: 8). Purse was an extremely influential figure in the early years of the union formation and through his stewardship a National Conference was convened in 1897 (Purse, 1919). Following this dawn of collective activism the loose association sought and achieved registration under the Trades Unions Acts with the objective of organising the blind population throughout Great Britain and Ireland. The organized blind community was to be politicized to add weight to the union’s demands for the State to take responsibility for the employment at adequate wages of all sightless persons already trained in workshop production methods and to provide a centralized training scheme for new entrants to the workshop sector. Additionally, for those who could not be trained, adequate pensions were demanded away from poor law provision (NLB, 1899).

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Largely due to frequent outspoken criticisms published in the Leagues official journal ‘The Blind Advocate’ founded in 1898, and because of many acts of resistance adopted by the militant activists the NLB faced hostility from many existing institutions for the blind which had the unintended consequence of causing victimization of members working in existing charity workshops (Banham, 1901: 1-2). The antagonism towards charities also caused the NLB to be excluded from most national conferences discussing the welfare of the blind which often affected government policy. So the NLB had a clear choice, it could remain a hostile critic with activists attempting to change the status quo from outside the dominant circles of power, or it could take a more conciliatory line attempting to alter opinions and hence policies from within existing power structures.

A critical period for the NLB occurred circa 1910 when the league principally through the influence of purse modified its approach to their relationship with charities to a point at which cooperation became possible. This pragmatic change saw the influence of the NLB increase in political circles and gain support from some influential individuals who aided a wider recognition of the organisation as a legitimate lobbying group attempting to influence policy, achieve social change and ultimately emancipate blind people from their oppressive relationship with charity (NLB, 1914; Purse, 1919). "

Wheeler, P. F. and Salt, F. W. (2006), Disabled activism, a historically problematic relationship with charity. Paper delivered at the Disability Studies Association Conference, Lancaster University, 18-20 September 2006.

The article mainly refers to the NLB's development in the UK and there is no reference to the NLBI forming as a separate branch in Ireland from 1898. It would seem from the various old documents previously published on this website, appertaining to the political aspirations of my great great grandfather John McDonnell who stood for election as a Poor Law governor under the banner of Sinn Fein, that his association with the NLBI may well have had both political and charitable connotations. Though as a successful blind entrepreneur himself, we might surmise that his personal ideology fell on the side of the rights of the blind person as a self-actualising worker rather than a recipient of charity.  

Certainly it seems that the user led National League of the Blind in both Great Britain and Ireland was a radical organisation compared to the big charitable institutions of the era such as the Royal National Institute for the Blind in London.

My email to the National League of the Blind Ireland

Dear Sir or Madam

I live in Birmingham in the UK and have for many years worked for user led disability organisations in the city. Last year I wrote a book about the history of the group I currently work for, Birmingham Disability Resource Centre (BDRC).

Just like NLBI, the BDRC is run by disabled people for disabled people.

It was quite a surprise for me therefore when I was researching my family tree to learn from family in Dublin that one of my ancestors, John McDonnell, was a blind person who was very active in the National League of the Blind in Ireland. He was also a Poor Law governor and a successful business man who ran a basket making factory in Dublin in the early 20th century.

I would love to find out more about John McDonnell and his involvement with NLBI and wondered if you keep any records about directors of the charity in the early 1900s or indeed anything about the history of the organisation which might help me to understand the context of the times in which Mr McDonnell and fellow blind activists were developing self help support services in Ireland.

I would be most grateful of any advice you can give me.

Yours faithfully


Peter Millington

Sunday, 28 August 2011

The Fennelly families of Kilminchy, Queen's County, Ireland in 1901 Census

The Fennelly family are related to my mom's ancestors, the Lawlors, who originated from County Laois, formerly known as Queen's County which lies in the Irish Midlands.

My great grandparents on my mom's paternal side were Denis and Catherine (or Kate) Lawlor. Denis Lawlor (sometimes Lalor) married Catherine Cushion at Maryborough RC chuch in the Union of Mountmeillick in 1903. 

Catherine's father was Thomas Cushion and her mother was Mary Cushion nee Fennelly. Catherine was born in 1874. Denis's parents were Michael Lawlor and Mary nee. Delany.

When Catherine Cushion married Denis Lawlor in 1903, according to the marriage certificate both of them resided at Kilminchy. However, I can not find Lawlor or Cushion families listed in the 1901 Census at Kilminchy though there are three families named Fennelly. Note here that I have previously posted details of Fennelly families at Kilminchy in the 1911 Census.   

Residents of a house 14 in Kilminchy (Maryborough Rural, Queen's Co.)



Fennelly Thomas 59 Male Head of Family Roman Catholic Queens Coty Farmer Read and write - Married -


Fennelly Mary 42 Female Wife Roman Catholic Queens Co - Read and write - Married -


Fennelly Danl 21 Male Son Roman Catholic Queens Co Farmers Son Read and write - Not Married -


Fennelly Thomas 19 Male Son Roman Catholic Queens Co Farmer's Son Read and write - Not Married -


Fennelly Julia 17 Female Daughter Roman Catholic Queens Co Farmer's Daughter Read and write - Not Married -


Fennelly Denis 15 Male Son Roman Catholic Queens Co Scholar Read and write - Not Married -


Fennelly Patrick 8 Male Son Roman Catholic


Residents of a house 13 in Kilminchy (Maryborough Rural, Queen's Co.)


Fennelly Robert 43 Male Head of Family Roman Catholic Queen's Co Farmer Read and write - Married -

Fennelly Ellen 32 Female Wife Roman Catholic Queens Co - Read and write - Married -

Fennelly Anne Female Daughter Roman Catholic

Residents of a house 7 in Kilminchy (Maryborough Rural, Queen's Co.)


Fennelly Christopher 46 Male Head of Family Roman Catholic Queens Co Farm Labourer Read and write - Married -

Fennelly Fanny 38 Female Wife Roman Catholic Queens Co - Read and write - Married -

Fennelly Julia 20 Female Daughter Roman Catholic Queens Co Seamstress Read and write - Not Married -

Fennelly James 11 Male Son Roman Catholic Queens Co Scholar Read and write - Not Married -

Fennelly Bridget 8 Female Daughter Roman Catholic

Residents of a house 2 in Kilminchy (Maryborough Rural, Queen's Co.)


Delany Michael 48 Male Head of Family Roman Catholic Queen Co Farmer Read and write - Married -

Delany Mary 40 Female Wife Roman Catholic


Dwyer family in the 1901 Census

The record below lists the Dwyer family of Balloughna, Wexford in the 1901 Irish Census. Andrew and Ann Dwyer, the parents in this family, are the great grandparents of my wife Theresa. Their son Andrew was her grand father, he married Bridget Mellon who is listed in the post below this one.

I encountered a few problems trying to find this family initially as they were not coming up in the index under the name Dywer or even O'Dwyer. I therefore searched under their address from the 1911 Census, which was Ballyoughna and sure enough here they are at house 8 but their surname was misspelt Dwier.  


Residents of a house 8 in Ballyoughna (Ballygarrett, Wexford)
Barony of Gorey, Parish of Kiltrisk, Parliamentray divisionof north Wexford

Dwier Andrew
52
Male
Head of Family
Roman Catholic
Born Co Wexford
Farmer
Cannot read
- Married -

Dwier
Ann
54
Female
Wife
Roman Catholic
Born Co Wexford
Read only
- Married -

Dwier
Liza
25
Female
Daughter
Roman Catholic
Born Co Wexford
Farmers Daughter
Read and write
- Not Married -

Dwier
Edward
23
Male
Son
Roman Catholic
Born Co Wexford
Farmers Son
Read only
- Not Married -

Dwier
Andrew
20
Male
Son
Roman Catholic
Born Co Wexford
Farmers Son
Read and write
- Not Married -

Forms B1 and B2
House and Building Returns


On the house and building return the Dwier family at house number 8 has three rooms between 5 adults and has two outhouses. The walls of the house are made of perishable materials such as mud or wood, the roof is also made from perishable materials such as thatch or wood and the front of the house has four windows. These features give the house a rating of being a 2nd class house.

In Form B2 of the return, the Dwyer's 2 outhouses are listed as a fowl house and a piggery.

On the same form the neighbouring families are named in houses 1 - 14 at Ballyoughna. There are some names which are familiar to us from the notes which have been previously posted on this website, notes which were made from the memories of Theresa's mom Kitty Dwyer. These names include:

Fortune, Casey, Middleton, Jordan, Walker, Whyte, Carter, Lawler, Doyle and O'Connor.

Bridget Mellon in the 1901 Census


Residents of a house 2 in Barraglan (Monamolin, Wexford)



Mellon Sarah
49
Female
Head of Family
R Catholic
Born Co Wexford
General Servant Domestic
Read and write 
Widow 



Mellon
Bridget
22
Female
Daughter
R Catholic
Co Wexford
Dressmaker
Read and write 
Not Married

Monday, 22 August 2011

Flanagan family recorded in the 1901 and 1911 Census

Kitty Dwyer's recall of the siblings of her mother, Catherine Stone, nee. Flanagan is useful in pinpointing the Flanagan family in the 1901 and 1911 census, even confirming the profession of Mary Ann the seamstress:

Residents of a house 17 in Raheen (Umma, Westmeath) in 1901:


Flanagan William 50 Male Head of Family Roman Catholic Westmeath Farmer Read and write - Married -


Flanagan Anne 48 Female Wife Roman Catholic Westmeath - Read and write - Married -


Flanagan Mary Anne 24 Female Daughter Roman Catholic Westmeath Seamstress Read and write - Not Married -


Flanagan Edward 20 Male Son Roman Catholic Westmeath Farmers Son Read and write - Not Married -


Flanagan Julia 15 Female Daughter Roman Catholic Westmeath Farmers Daughter Read and write - Not Married -


Flanagan William 13 Male Son Roman Catholic Westmeath Farmers Son Read and write - Not Married -


Flanagan Thomas 11 Male Son Roman Catholic Westmeath Scholar Read and write - Not Married -


Flanagan Kate 9 Female Daughter Roman Catholic Westmeath Scholar Read and write - Not Married -


Flanagan John 3 Male Son Roman Catholic Westmeath - Cannot read - Not Married -


The same family can be found at house 18 in Raheen (Umma, Westmeath) in 1911:




Flanagan, William aged 62 Male, Head of Family, Roman Catholic born in County W Meath, Farmer, Read and write English, Married - - - -


Flanagan Annie, 58, Female, Wife, Roman Catholic, born in Westmeath - Read English, Married - married 35 years, gave birth to 9 children of which 9 were alive 


Flanagan Edward 29 Male Son Roman Catholic Westmeath Agricultural Labourer Read and write English Single - - - -


Flanagan William 23 Male Son Roman Catholic Westmeath Agricultural Labourer Read and write English Single - - - -


Flanagan Thomas 20 Male Son Roman Catholic Westmeath Agricultural Labourer Read and write English Single - - - -


Flanagan John 12 Male Son Roman Catholic Westmeath Scholar Read and write English Single - - - -


Flanagan Julia 25 Female Daughter Roman Catholic Westmeath - Read and write English Single - - - -


Flanagan Catherine 18 Female Daughter Roman Catholic Westmeath - Read and write English Single - - - -

The buildings return from the same census

The Flanagan family of Raheen, Ballymore, Westmeath

Map of the parishes of Westmeath. Moate (marked in red) is in the south of the county, on the border with Offaly. The parish of Ballymore is number 3 on the map, not far to the north of Moate. Raheen is not to be confused with Rahan, an Offaly village near Tullamore.

My wife Theresa's maternal grandmother was Catherine (aka Kate) Stone, nee. Flanagan.

On her marriage certificate to Edward Stone in 1924, it is stated that Kate Flanagan was from Rehan and her father was a farmer named William Flanagan. The couple married at Ballymore in the Union of Athlone.

My mother-in-law Kitty Dwyer, nee. Stone, has previously told me that her mother Catherine had four brothers (Ned, William, Thomas and John) and four sisters (Julia, Mary Ann, Elizabeth and Margaret).

According to Kitty, Mary Ann Flanagan was a highly skilled dress maker whose reputation brought in a great deal of custom from the local gentry:

"Every year Mary Ann would receive an order from the local Church of Ireland vicar at Ballymore to stitch up fine lacy dresses for five of his daughters who would ride around the area in a horse and cart like a gaggle of geese in their fine outfits. Mary Ann married Jack Duffy. She was 91 years old when she died and her son died a few months after her".

Kitty also told me that Catherine's brother Ned died as a young man following a violent kick in the stomach from a horse. The event left a strong and lasting impression on Catherine and many years later she was recalled as being very nervous when her grandchildren were near horses in the fields around Lurgan, especially a young Michael Dwyer would would swing enthusiastically with his arms around the neck of a particular horse.

The Flanagan women are described by Kitty as being generally "floppy and floating". Catherine herself was a small and stout woman. She died on the 26th September 1981 aged 88 and is buried at Tubber cemetary with her husband Edward Stone (died 8th September 1947 aged 64) and their daughter Mary who died on 11th November 1947 aged 19.

Kitty has a Mass Card for Margaret Moran of 35 Magerton Road, Drimnagh, Dublin who died on 29th Auigust 1961 aged 78 years. This was Catherine Flanagan's sister Margaret.

Some history of Moate

The following notes about the history of Moate, the closest town to Lurgan are from a local history book called The Years Between. Moate, Co. Westmeath 1956-2006 by Vera Hughes.

These notes may help to create some context to the lives of the Stone(s) family at Lurgan.

From Chapter one - Beginnings

"Moate is a pretty, little, clean-built town, of a different air from the generality of Irish villages in this part of Ireland. This may be due to the gravelly soil (the Eiscir Riada) on which it stands"

Dr Thomas Molyneux, 1709

Moate started as a collection of primitive settlements surrounded by swampy marshes, woods and bogs.

In Medieval times an area of thatched cottages developed which were clustered around O'Melaghlin's Castle on the south side of what came to be the town.

In the 12th and 13th centuries Moate was a Norman town, it's name deriving from the Norman French "motte", a moat. An artificial hill was created by the Normans with a "fosse" or defensive ditch and a raised bailey.

In 1641 Oliver Cromwell spent one night in Moate and granted the O'Melaghlin Castle and some lands to one of his soldiers, Peter Humphreys. The Deed of Sale is still at the castle.

Humphreys sold the castle to another Cromwellian soldier, Captain John Clibborn. The Clibborn dynasty shaped the industrial life of the town for the next 200 years.

John Clibborn became a Quaker in 1660 and erected a Meeting House near the castle in 1694. He also built a walled Quaker burial ground.

In 1798 the chapel in Moate was turned into a barracks for British soldiers and stabling.

An Act of Parliament dispossessed the local gentry and gave land to English planters - middlemen and farmers with names such as Homan, English, Adamson, Robinson, Jones, Matthews, Telford, Potts, Hankinson, Fetherston, Marsh, Russell, Mitchel and Mulock.

Many were Quakers who led simple, unostentatious and industrious lives. They introduced new and better farming methods, reclaimed bogs and planted trees.

The industries of the Quakers in Moate included brewing, tanning, felt making, weaving, tile and brick making and linen & woolen goods manufacture.

Moate grew as a town in the 18th and 19th centuries and became prosperous.

In the 1880s there was a decline in the industries of Moate due to rececession and the restrictions on exports which had been placed by the Act of Union. There was a decline in the Clibborn linen industry in the 19th century which saw Moate morph into a market town.

   

The Stone family of Lurgan, Offaly

Recently arrived back from a visit to Theresa's mom Kitty Dwyer, nee. Stone of Tubber near Moate in Ireland. Kitty (my mother-in-law) has been in Tullamore hospital for the past few weeks but happily her condition is improving.

Whilst in Tullamore I took the opportunity to go into the Irish Midlands ancestry research office at Offaly Exhibition and Research Centre and picked up a research form so that I can request a full search on the Stone family. There will be a cost but I feel it will be worth it as there is a strong likelihood of them having access to good records about the Stone family at Lurgan and possibly some of the related families such as Duffy (Theresa's great grandmother Mary Duffy from Moate) and possibly Flannagan (Theresa's grandmother was Catherine Flannagan from Rehan).

The Stone family lived on farmland at Lurgan for a number of generations. I have previously posted up records from the 1911 and 1901 census detailing Daniel and Mary Stone living with their family on the farm at Lurgan and there are also details of neighbouring houses at Lurgan, many of which contained other families with the surname Stone.

We know from anecdotal information that a large area of land at Lurgan was divided between Daniel and his two brothers, said to be named Michael and John, though there are other individuals named Stone recorded in the Census including James and Charles. 

Whilst in Tubber this summer I had a brief conversation with Theresa's cousin Cormac Stone who still farms extensive areas of land in the county and might therefore be a likely person to know more about these three brothers and the division of the land by their father Timothy. But Cormac's knowledge is formed from the same anecdotal information as has been transmitted by his parents' generation (his mother was Anne Stone who was Kitty's oldest sister), so I now feel that a professional search may be the next best step as the Tullamore research centre have access to church, state, newspaper, estate and land records as well as the census data I have already explored.

What I have come across in my own records as I filled out the research form is that I have a very faint photocopy of the marriage certificate of Daniel Stones and Mary Duffy - information I don't think I have posted up on the website before now.

Daniel Stones of Lurgan, a bachelor of full age, married Mary Duffy of Moate, spinster of full age, on 1st May 1880 at Tubber.

Mary's father was Andrew Duffy - I can't fully make out his profession but it looks like Slisbrer (any suggestions as to what this might be would be gratefully received).

Daniel's father was Timothy Stones a farmer.

Witnesses were John Cahill and Mary Duffy.

Note the addition of the letter s after Stone to make it Stones. To be honest I don't think the variant spellings of surnames in the 19th century is worth pondering on as this was very common across Ireland and the UK. So I think we can use both Stone and Stones to refer to the same family.

Birth of Edward Stone

I also have a similar photocopied birth entry for Edward Stone (I got these from the public record office in Dublin many years ago). 
Catherine (nee. Flanagan) and Edward Stone
with daughter Anne Stone 
Edward Stone was Theresa's grandfather, he was one of the 9 children of Daniel and Mary Stone.

Edward was born on 19th February 1883 in Mullingar. His father Daniel Stone was a publican. His mother was Mary Stone nee. Duffy. The informant was Anne McTiernan who was present at the birth.

Marriage of Edward Stones and Kate Flanagan

Edward Stones and Kate Flanagan married at the church of Ballymore in the Union of Athlone on July 9th 1924. Both were of full age and single. Edward's profession was a farmer.

Edward's place of residence was Lurgan and his father was Daniel Stones, also a farmer. Kate's place of residence was Rehan and her father was William Flanagan, also a farmer.

The witnesses to their marriage were Richard Stones and Mary Duffy.

Wednesday, 3 August 2011

Stone families in and around Lurgan in the 1901 Census


The first record is the family of my wife's great grandparents Daniel and Mary Stones (spelt today Stone). My guess is that the second family, their neighbours at house 6, is headed by the widow of Daniel's brother Michael. These two families are at the same addresses 10 years later in the 1911 census. There are also families named Stone (without the 's' at the end) at houses 7, 8 and 9 at Lurgan.

If we consider how remote the rural area of Lurgan is even today in 2011, to have families named Stone and Stones occupying 4 consecutive farm houses strongly suggests that the four families have to be related.  

I have not come across the last family of Charles Stones before.

Incidentally there are many other families with the surname Stone recorded in the general area on the borders of Offaly and Westmeath in the 1911 census, about 700 individuals with the surname Stone in Ireland altogether.

Residents of a house 7 in Lurgan (Gorteen, King's Co.)
 Stones Dan 53 Male Head of Family Roman Catholic Kings Co Farmer Read write - Married -


Stones Mary 40 Female Wife Roman Catholic Kings Co - Read and write - Married -


Stones Edward 18 Male Son Roman Catholic Co Westmeath Farmer's Son Read write - Not Married -


Stones Mary 13 Female Daughter Roman Catholic Co Westmeath Scholar Read and write - Not Married -


Stones Kate 8 Female Daughter Roman Catholic Co Westmeath Scholar Read and write - Not Married -


Stones James 6 Male Son Roman Catholic Co Westmeath Scholar Read and write - Not Married -


Stones Richard 4 Male Son Roman Catholic Co Westmeath Scholar Read and write - Not Married -

Residents of a house 6 in Lurgan (Gorteen, King's Co.)



Stones Anne 35 Female Head of Family Roman Catholic Kings Co Farmer Read and write - Widow -


Warburton Teresa 26 Female Sister Roman Catholic Kings Co - Read and write - Not Married -


Stones Timothy 14 Male Son Roman Catholic Kings Co - Read and write - Not Married -


Stones Mary 12 Female Daughter Roman Catholic Kings Co Scholar Read and write - Not Married -


Stones Michael 10 Male Son Roman Catholic Kings Co Scholar Read and write - Not Married -


Stones Catherine 8 Female Daughter Roman Catholic Kings Co Scholar Read and write - Not Married -


Stones Elizabeth 6 Female Daughter Roman Catholic

Residents of a house 8 in Lurgan (Gorteen, King's Co.)


Stone James 60 Male Head of Family R Catholic Kings County Farmer Read and write English Married -

Stone Rose 55 Female Wife R Catholic King's County Farmer's Wife Read and write English Married -

Stone James 25 Male Son R Catholic King's County Farmer's Son Read and write English Not Married -

Stone Annie 23 Female Daughter R Catholic King's County Farmer's Daughter Read and write English Not Married -

Stone Edward 21 Male Son R Catholic King's County Farmers Son Read and write English Not Married -

Stone Rose 19 Female Daughter R Catholic King's County Farmer's Daughter Read and write English Not Married -

Stone Richard 16 Male Son R Catholic

Residents of a house 9 in Lurgan (Gorteen, King's Co.)


Stone John 54 Male Father R C Kings Co Farmer Read and write - Married -

Stone Rose 43 Female Wife R C Westmeath - Read and write - Married -

Stone John 18 Male Son R C Kings Co - Read and write - Not Married -

Stone Mary 16 Female Daughter R C Kings Co - Read and write - Not Married -

Stone Richard 11 Male Son R C Kings Co Attending School Read and write - - -

Stone Rose 8 Female Daughter R C Kings Co Attending School - - - -

Stone Thos Joe 6 Male Son R C


Residents of a house 7 in Gorteen (Gorteen, King's Co.)



Stones Charles 67 Male Head of Family Roman Catholic Co Kings Roman Catholic Read and write - Married -

Stones Mary 60 Female Wife Roman Catholic Co Kings Roman Catholic Read and write - Married -


Stones Marianne 24 Female Daughter Roman Catholic Co Kings Roman Catholic Read and write - Not Married -


Stones Laurence 20 Male Son Roman Catholic Co Kings Roman Catholic Read and write - Not Married -


Stones John C 19 Male Son Roman Catholic Co Kings Roman Catholic Read and write - Not Married -


Stones Honora 60 Female Sister Roman Catholic



1901 Census - Moate, Westmeath

Whilst searching the 1901 Census on the National Archives of Ireland website I came across this record of a small family named Stone (Stone is the maternal line of my wife's family - her mother's maiden name) living in a place named Legan in Moate.

It is likely that Legan is a different place to the ancestral farm at Lurgan which is between Moate and Clara (Moate is in Westmeath whilst Clara is in Offaly - formerly Kings County), not a mis-spelling.

What interests me most though is the presence of a teenage nephew named Timothy Stone aged 15. In the 1911 census record of the Stone family at Lurgan there was a Timothy Stone aged 26 (who was brother to my wife's grandfather Edward Stone). 

Is it possible that these two spinsters, Mary and Bessie Stone, living with their 88 year old mother Elizabeth Stone, were related to Daniel Stone (my wife's great grandfather?)    

Residents of a house 24 in Legan (Moate, Westmeath)



Stone Mary 60 Female Head of Family Roman Catholic King's County Shop Keeper Read and write - Not Married -


Stone Bessie 51 Female Sister Roman Catholic King's County Helper Read and write - Not Married -


Stone Elizabeth 88 Female Mother Roman Catholic Westmeath - Read and write - Widow -


Stone Timothy 15 Male Nephew Roman Catholic Westmeath Scholar Read and write - Not Married -

Cunningham Mary 65 Female Servant Roman Catholic

The family of John and Catherine McDonnell in the 1901 Census for Dublin

It has been a few months since I blogged a great deal of information about the family of my great-great grandfather John McDonnell of Dublin.

Thanks to my mom's Whelan cousins in Ireland I was able to write up a great deal of information about this distinguished gentleman who was a blind factory owner in Victorian and Ewardian Dublin, becoming successful through a basket weaving business and also active in his support of the national blind charity of Ireland and a Poor Law governer.

I have previously posted up information showing 70 year old John McDonnell with his wife Catherine, their daughter Catherine Barrett and son John McDonnell all living at 49 Bolton Street, Dublin in 1911.


Further research on the website of the National Archives of Ireland also show John and Catherine McDonnell in the 1901 Census, this time time living at 78 Chancery Street (Inns Quay, Dublin):



Mc Donnell Annie 18 Female Daughter R Catholic Dublin City Housekeeper Read and write - Not Married -


Mc Donnell John 60 Male Head of Family Roman Catholic Dublin City Basket Maker Cannot read - Married Blind


Mc Donnell John 13 Male Son R Catholic Dublin City Scholar Read and write - Not Married -


Mc Donnell Peter 12 Male Son R Catholic Dublin City Scholar Read and write - Not Married -


Mc Donnell Kate 49 Female Wife R Catholic Dublin City Housekeeper Read and write - Married

The 1901 Census included additional pages which recorded more features about each property, known as the house and building return. The McDonnell's property at 78 Chancery Street is listed on the following page:


Number 78 Chancery Street was a shop and house. It had no outhouses, the walls of the building were made of stone, brick or concrete, the roof was of slate, iron or tiles, the building had been 10 and 12 rooms and 7 windows at the front. When the scores for each of these features were added up the house had an overall score of 14, putting it in the category of being a 1st class house.

It was noted that only one family of 5 lived in the property and they occupied 10 rooms.


It is no big surprise that the 78 Chancery Street address in the 1901 census is the same adrdress which appears on the picture of John McDonnell's North City Basket Factory featured on the lovely sketch which survives in the Whelan family today.   

What we may note from this census record is that their 18 year old daughter Annie McDonnell is my great grand mother who married John Whelan in August 1904. The home address of the McDonnells on the marriage certificate is Cloghan Sands in County Dublin and John McDonnell senior's occupation is recorded as a farmer, not a basket weaver. So we can surmise that the McDonnells made their move to the country between 1901 and 1904 though were back in Dublin city by 1911.

It should also be noted that in the 1901 census there was a 12 year old son named Peter, who is not recorded in the 1911 census even though his odler brother John was recorded.

Was Peter McDonnell the son who is thought to have caused the fire which burnt down his father's Cloghan Sands farmstead in the countryside? If so, would this explain why the McDonnells were back in the city by 1911 with no sign of poor Peter?